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Mental Illness, Mass Shootings, & the Politics of American Firearms | UC Davis Behavioral Health Center of Excellence

Four assumptions frequently arise in the aftermath of mass shootings in the United States: (1) that mental illness causes gun violence, (2) that psychiatric diagnosis can predict gun crime, (3) that shootings represent the deranged acts of mentally ill loners, and (4) that gun control “won’t prevent” such incidents. Professor Metzl will address how assumptions about gun violence incorrectly link to stereotypes of mental illness and race in the United States.

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Gun Violence Prevention: A Community Conversation

Firearms have become increasingly prevalent in daily life over the past decade, as states like Tennessee loosen regulations governing most aspects of gun sales, purchases, and public carry privileges. This expansion raises a number of questions that an expert panel of academics, politicians, and activists will address…

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Art & The Politics of Health – TFAFORUM 2017

A panel of artists, intellectuals, and culture experts discuss the many ways that artists, their friends, and loved ones negotiate the complexities of health and illness through artistic expression. We will uncover the multiple layers through which bodies and societies experience health, illness, transcendence, and being. 

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Mental Illness, Mass Shootings, and the Politics of American Firearms: Changing the Terms of the Debate

Four assumptions frequently arise in the aftermath of mass shootings in the US: (1) that mental illness causes gun violence, (2) that psychiatric diagnosis can predict gun crime, (3) that shootings represent the deranged acts of mentally ill loners, and (4) that effective gun control laws will not prevent such incidents. Professor Metzl will discuss how these assumptions about gun violence are incorrectly linked to stereotypes of mental illness and race in the United States. These issues become obscured when mass shootings are framed as representative of all gun crime, and when “mentally ill” ceases to be a medical designation and becomes encoded as violent threat.

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Gun Policy in Trump’s America

The Institute for Public Knowledge at NYU invites you to join us for a panel discussion with leading legislators, activists, journalists, and academics to debate gun policy and it’s everyday effects under the most overtly pro-gun administration in modern memory.